Connect with Us:
Case 1: Sex Offense-Failure to Register PDF Print E-mail
My client, a teenager, was required to register as a sex offender. He had little to no family support and had a diminished mental capacity. The problem with this case is my client already had two prior failing to register offenses that probation had violated him on and if he was found guilty or pled guilty on the third case they were going to revoke the remainder of his probation and put him in prison for over ten years.

All three separate cases were still pending and I got the prosecutor to agree to try the most recent case first. My client was alleged to have moved from one house to another house that was three houses down and then was told by the officer to move back when he didn’t have permission from the owner of the house. She charged him with not updating his address to the old residence and for failing to register by giving false information.

At trial, after a thorough cross-examination of the officer, she admitted that the lease didn’t require my client to get permission from the owner. My client had permission to live there from his friend whose name was on the lease. She further admitted that she was the one who made him go back to the old house yet she was now trying to violate him for doing what she commanded. The jury obviously thought this was ridiculous because they found my client not guilty on all three counts in less than an hour.
 
Case 1: Sex Offense-Failure to Register PDF Print E-mail
My client, a teenager, was required to register as a sex offender. He had little to no family support and had a diminished mental capacity. The problem with this case is my client already had two prior failing to register offenses that probation had violated him on and if he was found guilty or pled guilty on the third case they were going to revoke the remainder of his probation and put him in prison for over ten years.

All three separate cases were still pending and I got the prosecutor to agree to try the most recent case first. My client was alleged to have moved from one house to another house that was three houses down and then was told by the officer to move back when he didn’t have permission from the owner of the house. She charged him with not updating his address to the old residence and for failing to register by giving false information.

At trial, after a thorough cross-examination of the officer, she admitted that the lease didn’t require my client to get permission from the owner. My client had permission to live there from his friend whose name was on the lease. She further admitted that she was the one who made him go back to the old house yet she was now trying to violate him for doing what she commanded. The jury obviously thought this was ridiculous because they found my client not guilty on all three counts in less than an hour.