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Case 2: Burglary PDF Print E-mail
My client was working for an employer on renovating a house when a burglary occurred. The day of the burglary, my client had gone to a store with his boss and purchased several items. The site was secured and these items were hidden. That night someone broke in and stole these items from the house. Even worse, the next day my client didn’t show up for work and didn’t return any phone calls. The employer reported the missing items and when asked about any possible suspects he mentioned my client. He was later arrested and charged with burglary, but he maintained his innocence. My client was already on probation but I convinced the probation officer to not go forward with a revocation and allow my client to bond out while awaiting the outcome of the trial. The state was offering prison time as part of a plea deal.

During trial, the officer admitted that he never even went to the house to confirm that a burglary took place. My client’s boss testified that he had hired other workers who were working at the house during the time of the burglary and that he was my client’s ride. He further admitted that there may have been a misunderstanding of whether my client was supposed to work the next morning and that he later learned that my client had broken his cell phone. The jury was not impressed with the complete lack of investigation in the case and found my client not guilty in less than thirty minutes.
 
Case 2: Burglary PDF Print E-mail
My client was working for an employer on renovating a house when a burglary occurred. The day of the burglary, my client had gone to a store with his boss and purchased several items. The site was secured and these items were hidden. That night someone broke in and stole these items from the house. Even worse, the next day my client didn’t show up for work and didn’t return any phone calls. The employer reported the missing items and when asked about any possible suspects he mentioned my client. He was later arrested and charged with burglary, but he maintained his innocence. My client was already on probation but I convinced the probation officer to not go forward with a revocation and allow my client to bond out while awaiting the outcome of the trial. The state was offering prison time as part of a plea deal.

During trial, the officer admitted that he never even went to the house to confirm that a burglary took place. My client’s boss testified that he had hired other workers who were working at the house during the time of the burglary and that he was my client’s ride. He further admitted that there may have been a misunderstanding of whether my client was supposed to work the next morning and that he later learned that my client had broken his cell phone. The jury was not impressed with the complete lack of investigation in the case and found my client not guilty in less than thirty minutes.